Slower food, please!

I am not a fan of slow food. With slow food I don’t mean good quality food that’s sourced locally. I mean slow food, like in waiting one hour for your food. If you’re hungry and you’re drinking your third aperitif because the food is not coming, then you’ll end up drunk at table. That’s probably not the ideal scenario for a romantic dinner.

Last weekend I was in London with my wife for a surprise weekend, including romantic dinners, in Margot, top Italian food, and in Nopi, the restaurant of celebrity chef Yotam Ottolenghi. We certainly did not have to wait long for our food in these restaurants. Actually, we hardly had to wait at all. Continue reading “Slower food, please!”

Unique Blogger Award

I am very thankful to Rini for nominating me for the Unique Blogger Award.

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Rini is a foodie who likes to explore some of the most exotic dishes. If you want to know, for instance, how an alligator and shrimp sandwich tastes like, check out Rini’s blog Yes All Roads Lead To Food.

With the Unique Blogger Award come three questions. Rini has lined up these three for me :

1. What is your life motto?

This is mine : Every little step takes you closer! And that can be to anywhere I want to go next. For example when I want to achieve something. Or also when I need to be patient, like when I am stuck again in the train… A very useful motto to have!

2. Do you believe in aliens?

Of course! They’re already here! They have funny blond hair, say weird things, and have already taken over power in the USA. It’s just a matter of time before the rest of the world will be at their feet…

3. Which place is your most favorite country to travel to and why?

Well, being a wine amateur, France is an obvious place for me to go to, and I love it. But having spent a week there last week, I’m reminded of their one billion roundabouts again, and of the very strict lunch times (no lunch after 13.30 where we were!). So that’s why I will put Italy on the first place, because it’s a foodie’s heaven! Really, no matter which village you go to, you will always find a restaurant where you will have authentic and extremely tasty food! And people are just so friendly. We were walking in Cremolino this morning and were spontaneously being greeted by the locals we came across. How nice is that!

I now get to nominate 15 bloggers for the Unique Blogger Award :

https://thewineanalyst.org

https://foodwineclick.com

https://winenoodle.com

http://enofylzwineblog.com

https://winewankers.com

http://oddbacchus.com

https://winepredator.com

https://savortheharvest.com

https://foodandwineaesthetics.com

http://www.sommstable.com

https://theswirlingdervish.com

https://rockinredblog.com

http://culinary-adventures-with-cam.blogspot.it

https://jillbarth.wordpress.com

https://winetalksandtastings.wordpress.com

And me three questions for them are the following :

1. If you could be any of the following three which one would you like to be : the sommelier, the winemaker, or the château owner? And why?

2. If you could choose one bottle for free, regardless of the price, which wine would you take?

3. If you had to choose between having the bottle you answered in question 2 or spending your holidays with Angelina Jolie/Brad Pitt (pick one), what would you choose?

These 15 bloggers can now also nominate 15 people if they want. If yes, they should notify them, share the link in a blog post to the blogger who has nominated them. And also ask three questions.

Have fun!

If it makes you happy… #Winophiles

…it must be Sud-Ouest! There are two reasons why I love Sud-Ouest, and why their wines do make me happy. First of all, if you’re a bit of a winegeek like me, you will feel very much like Charlie in the Chocolate Factory if you see the multitude of indigenous grapes that the Sud-Ouest has. Fer Servadou, braucol, duras, abouriou, gros manseng, petit courbu, you name it! Sometimes you will find that there’s a good reason why such grapes never  achieve stardom, and that’s simply because they do not produce very interesting wines… That, however, is not the case in the Sud-Ouest. I already wrote here about a hidden gem in Gaillac, made of braucol and duras. And I strongly recommend you to try out this food wine pairing. The reason why you will not find many of these wines in your typical wine shop is simply because there’s not alot being made. Take an appellation such as Marcillac. I once enjoyed a great Marcillac from Lionel Osmin. But all in all they only have 185 hectares of vineyard. Compare that to the 117.000 hectares of vineyard in the whole of Bordeaux and you’ll be able to put things in perspective. Continue reading “If it makes you happy… #Winophiles”

A whiter shade of red

I’ll be honest with you. I’m not much of a rosé drinker. In my opinion there are three categories of rosé : the cheap stuff that’s made to knock back on a summer day (and get extremely hammered), the rosés that are a more serious effort but do not offer added value to whites in the same price category, and then the few really interesting rosés that have something unique to offer. I consider the latter to represent about 5% of all rosés. And perhaps that’s still an optimistic guess.

Are you already tearing your hair out? Good! Normally I try to be a bit more subtle, but I thought that rosé is the kind of subject that lends itself perfectly to a few bold statements. And reactions of course! But before you start abusing your keyboard, bear with me for a minute. Continue reading “A whiter shade of red”

Master Class Bordeaux with Fiona Morrison MW

The alumni association of sommeliers-conseil organised a master class with Fiona Morrison, Master of Wine (MW), on Bordeaux. And I had the pleasure of being there. Not only does Fiona Morrison hold the most prestigious title in the wine world, she is also married to Jacques Thienpont, the Belgian owner of some of the most famed estates in Bordeaux, such as Château Le Pin, Vieux Château Certan, and l’If. That makes her very well placed to talk about Bordeaux, obviously, but also about the wine culture of the Belgians, as she lives and works in Belgium.

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Jacques Thienpont, Fiona Morrison MW, Cyrille Thienpont ©Château Le Pin

One of the first things she learned after coming to Belgium was that good wine for Belgians means red wine, and Bordeaux… Yes, generally speaking, we do have a classical taste. Belgium is even the biggest importer of right-bank Bordeaux, beating China, Germany and the US! It actually makes you wonder why we so often describe our life style as “Burgundian”… Continue reading “Master Class Bordeaux with Fiona Morrison MW”