Unique Blogger Award

I am very thankful to Rini for nominating me for the Unique Blogger Award.

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Rini is a foodie who likes to explore some of the most exotic dishes. If you want to know, for instance, how an alligator and shrimp sandwich tastes like, check out Rini’s blog Yes All Roads Lead To Food.

With the Unique Blogger Award come three questions. Rini has lined up these three for me :

1. What is your life motto?

This is mine : Every little step takes you closer! And that can be to anywhere I want to go next. For example when I want to achieve something. Or also when I need to be patient, like when I am stuck again in the train… A very useful motto to have!

2. Do you believe in aliens?

Of course! They’re already here! They have funny blond hair, say weird things, and have already taken over power in the USA. It’s just a matter of time before the rest of the world will be at their feet…

3. Which place is your most favorite country to travel to and why?

Well, being a wine amateur, France is an obvious place for me to go to, and I love it. But having spent a week there last week, I’m reminded of their one billion roundabouts again, and of the very strict lunch times (no lunch after 13.30 where we were!). So that’s why I will put Italy on the first place, because it’s a foodie’s heaven! Really, no matter which village you go to, you will always find a restaurant where you will have authentic and extremely tasty food! And people are just so friendly. We were walking in Cremolino this morning and were spontaneously being greeted by the locals we came across. How nice is that!

I now get to nominate 15 bloggers for the Unique Blogger Award :

https://thewineanalyst.org

https://foodwineclick.com

https://winenoodle.com

http://enofylzwineblog.com

https://winewankers.com

http://oddbacchus.com

https://winepredator.com

https://savortheharvest.com

https://foodandwineaesthetics.com

http://www.sommstable.com

https://theswirlingdervish.com

https://rockinredblog.com

http://culinary-adventures-with-cam.blogspot.it

https://jillbarth.wordpress.com

https://winetalksandtastings.wordpress.com

And me three questions for them are the following :

1. If you could be any of the following three which one would you like to be : the sommelier, the winemaker, or the château owner? And why?

2. If you could choose one bottle for free, regardless of the price, which wine would you take?

3. If you had to choose between having the bottle you answered in question 2 or spending your holidays with Angelina Jolie/Brad Pitt (pick one), what would you choose?

These 15 bloggers can now also nominate 15 people if they want. If yes, they should notify them, share the link in a blog post to the blogger who has nominated them. And also ask three questions.

Have fun!

If it makes you happy… #Winophiles

…it must be Sud-Ouest! There are two reasons why I love Sud-Ouest, and why their wines do make me happy. First of all, if you’re a bit of a winegeek like me, you will feel very much like Charlie in the Chocolate Factory if you see the multitude of indigenous grapes that the Sud-Ouest has. Fer Servadou, braucol, duras, abouriou, gros manseng, petit courbu, you name it! Sometimes you will find that there’s a good reason why such grapes never  achieve stardom, and that’s simply because they do not produce very interesting wines… That, however, is not the case in the Sud-Ouest. I already wrote here about a hidden gem in Gaillac, made of braucol and duras. And I strongly recommend you to try out this food wine pairing. The reason why you will not find many of these wines in your typical wine shop is simply because there’s not alot being made. Take an appellation such as Marcillac. I once enjoyed a great Marcillac from Lionel Osmin. But all in all they only have 185 hectares of vineyard. Compare that to the 117.000 hectares of vineyard in the whole of Bordeaux and you’ll be able to put things in perspective. Continue reading “If it makes you happy… #Winophiles”

A whiter shade of red

I’ll be honest with you. I’m not much of a rosé drinker. In my opinion there are three categories of rosé : the cheap stuff that’s made to knock back on a summer day (and get extremely hammered), the rosés that are a more serious effort but do not offer added value to whites in the same price category, and then the few really interesting rosés that have something unique to offer. I consider the latter to represent about 5% of all rosés. And perhaps that’s still an optimistic guess.

Are you already tearing your hair out? Good! Normally I try to be a bit more subtle, but I thought that rosé is the kind of subject that lends itself perfectly to a few bold statements. And reactions of course! But before you start abusing your keyboard, bear with me for a minute. Continue reading “A whiter shade of red”

Master Class Bordeaux with Fiona Morrison MW

The alumni association of sommeliers-conseil organised a master class with Fiona Morrison, Master of Wine (MW), on Bordeaux. And I had the pleasure of being there. Not only does Fiona Morrison hold the most prestigious title in the wine world, she is also married to Jacques Thienpont, the Belgian owner of some of the most famed estates in Bordeaux, such as Château Le Pin, Vieux Château Certan, and l’If. That makes her very well placed to talk about Bordeaux, obviously, but also about the wine culture of the Belgians, as she lives and works in Belgium.

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Jacques Thienpont, Fiona Morrison MW, Cyrille Thienpont ©Château Le Pin

One of the first things she learned after coming to Belgium was that good wine for Belgians means red wine, and Bordeaux… Yes, generally speaking, we do have a classical taste. Belgium is even the biggest importer of right-bank Bordeaux, beating China, Germany and the US! It actually makes you wonder why we so often describe our life style as “Burgundian”… Continue reading “Master Class Bordeaux with Fiona Morrison MW”

Pear meets flint

Only three days left before I go to Burgundy for a weekend of pinot noir showers and sucking snails out of their shells. But a promise is a promise. I told you I would come back to you before I go to Burgundy with a hidden gem from Italy. And it’s a white one for that matter! I still hear people saying from time to time that Italy does not make good white wine. I agree that Italy is mostly known for its majestuous reds, but wouldn’t it be weird, to say the least, that a country that challenges France for the biggest wine production, and that has an enormous diversity of autochtonous grapes, did not produce good white wine?!

Friuli is a region that some of you might already know as a region that produces elegant whites. But the wine I want to share with you today comes from Campania. That is not another family member of Donald Trump, but the region around Naples. That’s pretty far south to make white wine, you might think. And yet, this is a region that actually produces more than one white that merits your attention, such as Fiano di Avellino and Falanghina. But today’s wine is a Greco di Tufo, Loggia della Serra 2015, produced by Terredora Di Paola : the nose is absolutely breathtaking with ripe pear, but it’s especially the minerality, the flint, that adds a layer of finesse and playfulness. A little bit of je ne sais quoi, to use a beautiful Italian expression… The acidity in this wine balances the ripe fruit so beautifully that it is literally mouthwatering, making you grab your glass instantly for more. If you can find this wine, do try it out! You will not be disappointed, nor will you be bust, as this little beauty only costs around 12€…

The people behind this wine are no strangers. Terredora is one of the most well-known wineries in Campania, created by Walter Mastroberardino in 1993. If this name rings a bell, don’t look too far. Walter is the brother of Antonio Mastroberardino, who leads the winery Mastroberardino, probably the most important winery of the region. Walter and Antonio went their separate ways after a dispute, and Walter named his winery after his wife, Dora di Paola.

If only all family feuds led to such great results…

 

Weingut Günther Steinmetz in the Mosel

I was in the Mosel Valley, Germany, in November last year. For family holidays in the first place. But if you’re reading this, chances are high that also you choose your holiday destinations in a way that you can visit a winery or two… Everybody happy (that’s what I tell myself), win win for sure!
And even if you don’t like Mosel wines, the region is absolutely beautiful. Think of the most picturesque wine landscapes you can think of. Well, that’s the Mosel valley. Vineyards as far as you can see, crawling up some of the steepest hillsides I’ve ever seen in a wine region. Only to be interrupted by tiny white villages here and there. Impressive!IMG_0786
The Mosel is riesling land, of course. And even though I like riesling, I never really had a chance to explore riesling in great detail. All the more reason why I definitely wanted to squeeze in a visit or two. I visited the wineries of Markus Molitor and Gunther Steinmetz. I will tell you more about the stunning tasting I had at Molitor’s another time, because today I had my first riesling of Gunther Steinmetz since my visit in November. It was the 2015 Kestener Paulinshofberg. 2015 is hailed as a very good vintage, combining ripeness with good acidity. So I was happy of course that I could sample the 2015 Rieslings at Günther Steinmetz’. For your information, don’t look for Günther in case you visit. It’s his son Stefan who’s in charge now and who makes the wines. I saw Stefan on his way out when I arrived, because there was work to be done in the vineyard. It was All Saints’ Day, so most people don’t work then, but that’s not the case for winemakers. When there’s work in the vineyard, it’s need to be done! IMG_0669So I tasted his wines with Sammie, his wife. Sammie is actually American and quite new to the wine business. But she obviously learned really fast. I was impressed by her knowledge, and I had a great tasting. My German is lousy, by the way, so that was very convenient…
Before I go further, let me just share today’s experience with the Kestener Paulinshofberg. When I tasted it in November, it was still a bit closed, so I was happy today to see that it had opened up quite a bit. The nose was very fine, with mineral aromas and pine apple at the first sniff. But more came out after a little while, with lemon, aniseed, spring flowers, orange zest and sage. Yes, sage! I think that’s the first time I spontaneously smell that in a wine. Lovely nose. The wine confirms what I had read about the vintage : ripe fruit, but also very fresh. The tension that I love in Riesling was also nicely present here. Not a very long finish, but a wine I really enjoyed with the Asian style salmon we had for dinner. The great thing about this wine is that you get bang for your buck. This bottle cost 12,50€ at the winery. And that’s what I like so much about the wines of Stefan. They are pretty darn good, and they don’t set you back too much. Unfortunately, I can’t say the same about the wines of Markus Molitor. Outstanding for sure, but a bit more expensive…
I will not go through all my tasting notes but just give you my favorites :

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  • Dhroner Hofberg 2015 : another price/quality stunner. At first there was animality in the nose, but then came beautiful aromas of grapefruit, wisteria and honeysuckle. Not completely dry, but good acidity to balance the wine. 11€.
  • Wintricher Ohligsberg GW 2015 : White pepper, a bit timid still, but then also citrus coming through, a touch of safran, and a hint of petrol. This is still young, but great potential. I expect this to age nicely. Can’t wait to see how this will turn out in a few years. 17€.
  • Piesporter Goldtröpfchen Spätlese 2015 : This was Sammie’s personal favorite and I had no problem seeing why. While the nose is still a bit reductive, it is also very subtle, with a hint of petrol beginning to come through. The wine is creamy, rich, with pine apple and again great acidity to keep this wine in balance. Even though this is a Spätlese (generally a sweeter style), the freshness of the wine is beautiful. Everything I expect from a Riesling. 15,50€.

So in a nutshell : the wines of Stefan Steinmetz are really beautiful. He makes more dry wines than sweet wines, but I liked both, the sweet wines being real charmers! The wines were still very young, but I expect them to evolve really nicely, developing more depth and complexity. I will tell you in a couple of years how they turned out. If I will be able to wait that long…

Hopefully, Stefan will keep his prices at this level. His wines receive very positive reviews and are being served in New York restaurants. So I’m obviously not the only one who appreciates his wines. Time will tell. In the meantime, I got myself a little stash…